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Shropshire

IN AND AROUND SHREWSBURY WITH A WHEELCHAIR

 

image of a black and white building in Shrewsbury 

    

A black and white building near the castle

 

For accessible places to stay in the area please scroll to the bottom of the page and for a wider accommodation search for other areas of Shropshire and the UK click here.

Shrewsbury is the county town of Shropshire and has a wealth of beautiful black and white timbered buildings. It successfully combines individual and interesting smaller shops with larger well known outlets without losing the medieval character of the town. It has an unusual setting lying within a loop of the river Severn (rendering it almost an island) accessed by the Welsh bridge in the west and the English bridge to the east and encompassing two hills. These hills mean that a large part of the town has steep inclines and therefore disabled visitors without motorised chairs will need a strong pusher to assist them. If this is not possible then there is disabled parking at various points throughout the town and it is possible to park near the square and see that area then relocate to a higher point and see the area around the castle. Alternatively the park and ride scheme that operates in the town has buses with level access and it is possible to alight at the top of the town. Having made your way down the hill you can then return from a bus stop at the lower end of town.

 

There are guided walking tours of the town that give an extremely interesting and informative view of the many unusual buildings, shuttes and passages that make Shrewsbury unique. These tours start from the Tourist Information centre situated in Rowleys Museum in Barker Street and are daily in the summer months and on Saturdays during the winter. When booking it is helpful to mention if you are using a wheelchair, as the guide will bear this in mind when selecting a route to follow. Please note that some of the smaller streets have cobbles and uneven surfaces.

St. Mary's Church is one of several churches that lie within the town walls and is the only one that still has the original structure dating back to the 11th century. It contains very beautiful stained glass windows that were brought from various parts of Europe. Over the main door is a plaque that tells of a former resident of the town called Cadman who fell to his death while performing a stunt on a rope attached to the church steeple. There are guided tours of the church on Saturday morning.

In the square is the Old Market Hall which houses a cinema and coffee shop, it has a lift to the first floor. If you wish to see a film here it is necessary to book in advance to ensure a wheelchair space tel: 01743 281281. There is also a designated toilet on site. 

 

The Dingle

 

image of The Dingle 

The Dingle 

A short walk from here up Claremont Hill is the town park called The Quarry which provides pleasant riverside walks. Situated in the park is the Dingle which is a small lake and a sunken garden that has beautiful displays of floral bedding in the spring and summer. For two days in August each year the famous Shrewsbury Flower Show is held here.

The Shropshire Regimental Museum

 

Shropshire Regimental Museum

The museum is housed in Shrewsbury castle and most of it is accessible to wheelchairs. However the ramped entrance has a steep incline and some assistance may be needed. The museum contains many artefacts showing the history of four Shropshire regiments throughout the centuries and the well informed custodians help bring this to life. There is a small shop and a very good accessible toilet on site. Open air plays are performed in the castke grounds during the summer months.

 

For more detailed accessibility info and a link to their website please click here

 

Shrewsbury Abbey

 

image of Shrewsbury Abbey

Shrewsbury Abbey

Shrewsbury Abbey is situated on Abbey Foregate on the eastern side of the town over the English bridge. The Saxons had a church here before the Normans came in 1070 but the Benedictine Abbey was started in 1083. During the dissolution of the abbey in 1540 much of building was demolished but the original Norman arches remain. It is well worth a visit, wheelchair users need to use the level entrance on the right hand side of the building. There is a small car park at the front as well as disabled parking in the street.

For more detailed accessibility information and a link to their own website please click here

Across the road on the original site of some of the abbey buildings is The Shropshire Wildlife Trust. There is a small herb garden, a shop with displays about the Shropshire countryside and a designated toilet. It is possible to obtain from here a key to the bird hide at Monkmoor Pool on the outskirts of Shrewsbury. Both the pathway and hide are wheelchair accessible.

 

The Old Canal Towpath

 

image of the old canal

The towpath along the old canal

In and around Shrewsbury are several wheelchair friendly footpaths including the old canal that runs from Ditherington to Uffington. This can be accessed from various points including Lesley Owen Way off of Sundorne Road. The path has a hard surface and is a pleasant mostly level walk. 

For more information on accessible trails in and around the county you can download a copy of 'The Wheelchair User's Guide for Accessible Countryside Sites and Trails in Shropshire and the Borderlands' which features the trail from our publications page. Alternatively you can request a copy to be sent by post from our contact us page.

 

Battlefield 1403

image of Battlefield Visitor Centre

The courtyard at Battlefield Visitor Centre

Battlefield 1403 is a visitor centre which opened in 2008 and is situated on a farm, 3 miles north of Shrewsbury just off of the A49. There is designated parking, two designated toilets, a farm shop selling a wide variety of local products and a cafe selling light snacks and meals on site.

image of the 1403 exhibition

The 1403 Battle Exhibition

The exhibition is housed in a former farm building and describes the events that took place during the Battle of Shrewsbury which was fought on the 21st of July, 1403 in the fields adjacent to the farm.

For more detailed accessibility info please click here

 

image of Battlefield Heritage Trail with Jim Hawkins from Radio Shropshire

Trying out Battlefield Heritage Trail with Jim Hawkins from Radio Shropshire

 

Nearby is Battlefield Church which has a 4 inch (approx) step and the Battlefield Heritage Trail. Wheelchairs users will need to drive the three quarters of a mile to the trail car park as the path from the visitor centre is unsuitable for wheelchairs.

 

Melverley Church

 

image of Melverley Church

Melverley Church

Approximately 10 miles west of the town is the black and white timbered church of St. Peter's at Melverley. It was built in 1406 on the site of an older church that was burnt down by Owain Glyndwr. There is a small step into the churchyard and a ramp inside the door under a staircase which can be laid down for wheelchair access into the church. Although the church is only small it is beautiful and an interesting place to visit. 

Attingham Park

 

image of the Kitchen at Attingham

The Kitchen at Attingham

About 4 miles Southeast of Shrewsbury on the B4380 is Attingham Park owned by The National Trust. The  house built in 1785 is very interesting with many fine paintings and access is very good, you can see all the rooms on the first and ground floors, including the kitchen and servants quarters. Every effort is made to encourage families with children, including quiz sheets available for two age groups and a room where youngsters can have hands on experience of life at the time.

image of approaching the accessible entrance

Approaching the accessible entrance

There is a tearoom but unfortunately this is not wheelchair accessible however if you have someone with you who can negotiate two steps there is seating outside that you can access in suitable weather. If not then there is a cafe situated in the stable block near the entrance. The Park has a network of accessible paths which are suitable for wheelchairs, there is also a farm, secret garden and play area. Attingham also host's many events and activities throughout the year and visitors will need to allocate a whole day to explore this attraction fully.

For more detailed accessibility info please click here

image of the exterior of the cookery school

As an idea for a more unusual and enjoyable day out, why not try a full or half day course at the Brompton Cookery School which has recently been opened at Brompton Farm on another part of the Attingham Estate a couple of miles away.

For more detailed accessibility info please click here

 

Much Wenlock

 

image of the Guildhall at Much Wenlock

The old Guildhall at Much Wenlock

About 12 miles southeast of Shrewsbury on the A458 is the small historic town of Much Wenlock. It has an interesting selection of small shops and old buildings. There is a small museum, situated to the rear of the Tourist Information Centre, that explores the history of the local area including the towns connection with the Olympic Movement. On Saturdays there are stalls selling local produce situated underneath the Guildhall and in front of the library. There is a pottery and craft centre in the town with a shop, small tearoom and a disabled toilet. There are several accessible places to eat in the town  but our researchers tried the 14th century Talbot Inn which is situated in the High Street. They had an excellent lunch freshly prepared from local produce. There is access through the archway to tables in the courtyard on fine days and via the second doorway and down a shallow step to the inside dining area.

 

Wenlock Priory

 

image of Wenlock Priory

 Wenlock Priory

Several hundred yards from the town centre is the ruins of Wenlock Priory now owned by English Heritage. It is a very old site, a religious house was first founded here in around AD 680. There is a free car park opposite the priory and ramped access to the entrance. Audio guides are available from the shop to make your visit more informative and enjoyable.

For more detailed accessibility info please click here

 

The Long Mynd

 

image of the Long Mynd

A view from the top of the Long Mynd

Approximately 15 miles South of Shrewsbury on the A49 is the small town of Church Stretton that has a good selection of small shops, a reasonable proportion of which you can access and an antique centre (with a lift to all floors). In the main street is a cafe called Mr Bun the Baker that only has a shallow step to negotiate and that serves home cooked meals and snacks.

If you follow the signposts in the town to The Burway you can drive up the very steep single tracked road on to The Long Mynd. These are the hills that tower above the town on the Welsh side, the views over the surrounding countryside from the various viewpoints along the roadway are some of the most beautiful in England. If you do not wish to drive yourself then why not try the shuttlebus (see details further down).

 

Carding Mill Valley

 

image of Carding Mill Valley

 

Nearby is Carding Mill Valley, a beautifully scenic part of the Shropshire countryside that is owned by The National Trust. You can access the valley from the All Stretton road and about halfway along there is a tearoom, shop and disabled toilet. Unfortunately due to the unspoiled naturally hilly terrain, the pathways are unsuitable for wheelchairs but there are wonderful views from the car park and picnic area.

For more detailed accessibility info please click here

 

The Stiperstones

 

image of the Stiperstones Nature Reserve

The Stiperstones

If you cross the Long Mynd and head for Ratlinghope there is a signpost to The Stiperstones Nature Reserve. There are disabled parking spaces in the reserve car park and a gate to an all ability path with a good surface, a tapping rail and several benches. The path is approximately 500 metres long and there are 6 information points along the route. These have braille instructions and maps as well as audio recordings giving information about the area with local legends and stories.

 

image of The Bog Visitor Centre

The Bog Visitor Centre

A short distance away by car is the Bog Visitor Centre which has recently been improved to provide ramped access and an accessible toilet. It is staffed by a team of local volunteers who serve light refreshments and sell local crafts.

If you wish to see the Long Mynd, the Stiperstones and other parts of the Shropshire hills without having to use your own car the Shropshire Shuttle buses operate a route in the area. NB The service will cease on September the 25th this year 2011 and should resume in April 2012.

PLACES TO STAY

 

The Hampton by Hilton Hotel

 

The Hampton by Hilton Hotel Shrewsbury

The Hotel is situated in Sitka Drive to the south of the town with easy access from the M54 and A5. This hotel has four accessible rooms, three with low level baths and one with a wheel-in shower. The hotel specifications are to a high standard including wider corridors and access around the hotel is extremely good.

The hotel restaurant

The accessible rooms are of an excellent size with access to either side of the bed for wheelchair users. In this particular hotel, access to the en-suite wheel-in shower is good but not ideal however the company that built the hotel were diligent in their efforts to ensure a fully accessible room was added to the already existing building plan. The accessible rooms have the option of an interconnecting adjoining room for families or persons travelling with a carer. There is a bar and restaurant on site and designated parking spaces in the car park.

 

For more detailed accessibility information please click here

 

Battlefield Travelodge

 

image of Battlefield Travelodge

Battlefield Travelodge

The Travelodge Shrewsbury :- Two good sized rooms, one smoking and one non smoking with sufficient wheelchair turning space to allow right or left hand transfer to the double bed. A single bed can be added to the room for a child or carer if required and the wardrobe has a lowered rail. The en-suite wheel-in shower room has good wheelchair turning space and room to allow side transfer to the toilet. There is a fold down seat in the shower and the controls are within reach when seated. There is designated parking on site and adjacent to the lodge is an accessible restaurant. This could be suitable for accompanied and unaccompanied wheelchair users.

For more detailed accessibility please click here more info

 

The Sandford House Hotel

 

image of Sandford House Hotel

Sandford House Hotel Annexe

The Sandford House Hotel  Shrewsbury :- This hotel has a separate annexe (accessed through a side gate and via a ramped pathway from the pretty courtyard garden) that includes two wheelchair accessible rooms. It is the only one within the town's boundaries with en-suites with a wheel-in shower (portable folding shower seat available) and toilet (no room to side transfer). The comfortable and compact rooms have twin beds that can be arranged as a double if required. Breakfast is served in the rooms as the main hotel has a stepped entrance and is not wheelchair accessible. There is limited parking at the hotel but within fifty yards is a public car park.
Tel: 01743 343829

 

The Old Station

 

image of The Old Station

The Old Station Bed and Breakfast at Leaton

The Old Station is situated at Leaton approximately 3 miles north of Shrewsbury. The original station building has been tastefully restored and extended to provide seven themed guest rooms and suites including a ground floor accessible room with an en-suite wetroom.

image of the accessible room

Some of the themed decoration in the accessible room.

The room has a king sized antique bed with left hand transfer (and right hand by arrangement). The room is spacious but some furniture can be removed to allow access for larger wheelchairs if requested. Breakfast is served in the former waiting room. Although the station is adjacent to the main line (Chester to Shrewsbury) the B&B is surprisingly peaceful and the passage of the trains was hardly noticeable. Telephone 01939 290905.

For more detailed accessibility information click here

 

Penn Peel Cottage B&B

 

image of the front doors to both rooms

The Merrington and the Bomere Guest Rooms

Penn Peel B&B is located in an attractive rural setting within the village of Bomere Heath approximately 4 miles north of Shrewsbury. The owners have taken great care to ensure that the property is suitable for guests with easy access needs. There are two self contained guest rooms accessed of the driveway at the rear of the property. The Merrington which is a twin bedded room with en-suite wet-room is wheelchair accessible via a portable ramp. The adjacent Bomere has an en-suite shower room and would be ideal for carers/companions, family and friends or guests with more ambulant disabilities.

 

image of a wheelchair user in the lounge

The Guest Lounge

The original cottage dates back to 1860 and an attractive guest lounge with a log burner (ideal for winter breaks) has been created in the oldest part of the property. This is a family run enterprise and a great deal of thought has been given to ensuring guests a warm welcome and a comfortable stay.

For more detailed accessibilty information and a link to their own website please click here.

To download a pdf giving detailed measurements of the B&B rooms compiled by the owners please click here.

 

Lyth Hill House

 

image of Lyth Hill House

Lyth Hill House

 

Lyth Hill House, Lyth Hill, Nr Shrewsbury :- This attractive and friendly bed and breakfast accommodation is situated on Lyth Hill overlooking the beautiful Shropshire countryside just five miles south of Shrewsbury. There are four rooms, two of which (one double and one super king/twin) have en-suites with level access showers and room to side transfer to the toilets (one left hand and one right). There is a pretty wheelchair friendly garden and the property has a ramped entrance. Mobility aids including a wheelchair and portable hoist can be arranged with prior notice. The breakfast (with extensive menu) is served in the dining room and guests also have use of a pleasant lounge and a heated indoor swimming pool. This could be suitable for accompanied and unaccompanied wheelchair users.

For more detailed accessibility please click here more info

 

Newton Meadows

 

image of Newton Meadows

Newton Meadows

 

Newton Meadows is approximately 6 miles north of Shrewsbury at Harmer Hill on the A528:- There are three pleasant level access self catering cottages, one sleeping up to 4 people and two sleeping up to 7 people. Each has a wheel-in shower room with turning space and room to side transfer to the toilet. They all have an easily accessed open plan kitchen/dining/lounge area and a sun room leading to an outside patio. The smaller of the cottages has one ground floor bedroom with twin beds with sufficient underneath clearance to allow use of a portable hoist. It also has an upstairs bedroom with ensuite bathroom. The other cottages have one twin and one single ground floor bedroom (beds allowing use of a portable hoist) and one twin and one double bedroom upstairs with a separate bathroom. Guest may also access the grounds that include a pond. A portable hoist can be arranged with prior notice. This could be suitable for accompanied wheelchair users.

For more detailed accessibility information please click here  more info

An image of Newton Meadow's Free Range Chickens

Free Range Chickens at Newton Meadows

 

The Premier Inn Harmer Hill

 

 

There is also a Premier Inn located at Harmer Hill. It has one ground floor accessible room with an en-suite wetroom. Breakfast and evening meals are served in the Bridgewater Arms a Brewers Fayre restaurant adjacent to the hotel. This could be suitable for accompanied and unaccompanied wheelchair users.

For more detailed accessibility please click here more info

Shrewsbury is an excellent base to explore the beautiful rural countryside of Shropshire, one of England's lesser known counties

 

 

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